Posts Tagged ‘UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples’

Earth Peoples co-founder José Carlos Morales term at UN Independent Experts on the Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples expired

Thursday, April 4th, 2013

The Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (EMRIP) was established by the Human Rights Council, the UN’s main human rights body, in 2007 under Resolution 6/36 as a subsidiary body of the Human Rights Council.

We are very proud that José Carlos Morales, one of Earth Peoples co-founders, served since the beginning of EMRIP for the period 2008 – 2013 as one of five independent experts. His term expired this month, after five years of devotion and hard work to strengthen the indigenous cause for indigenous peoples worldwide.

José Carlos Morales (Photo © Rebecca Sommer)

José Carlos Morales (Photo © Rebecca Sommer)

José Carlos Morales, from the indigenous people Brunka Indians (also known as the Boruca or the Brunca) was also the first indigenous Latin American to be honored to be the president of the World Council of Indigenous People, as well as earning the title as the Focal Point of the Decade for Indigenous People in the United Nations. Morales also presided as president of the Regional Council of Indigenous People, making him a true source of pride for his people, the Brunka Tribe from Costa Rica.

He also proudly represented the World Enclave of Indigenous People for three whole years before becoming involved with the United Nations, where he was one of the active indigenous leaders during the United Nations Declaration on the Indigenous Peoples’ Rights negotiation process.

He is certainly known an “old timer” in the world’s global indigenous movement, together with many others that have devoted their live, time and money to push for indigenous rights at the local, national and international level, such as Andrea Carmen (IITC), Kenneth Deer and Petuuche Gilbert from IWA, Mililani Trask, Hector Huertas, Tanya Frichner (AILA), Saudata Aboubacrine,  Arthur Manuel (INET),  (Wilton Littechild (IRIOD) among many others.

Wilton Littechild’s and Annie Lasimbang’s term as EMRIP independent experts’ expire next year, in 2014.

The Expert Mechanism is made up of five independent experts on the rights of indigenous peoples. The experts are appointed by the Human Rights Council which is to give due regard to experts of indigenous origin as well as to gender balance and geographic representation.

More information about the members of the Expert Mechanism can be found here:
members of the Expert Mechanism.

Also watch the video about the Expert Mechanism, which has been produced to raise awareness about the Expert Mechanism.
Watch:VIDEO

Work done so far, and published on EMRIPs website:

Expert Mechanism Advice
In association with each of its studies, and the associated theme, the Expert Mechanism drafts advice to contribute to international jurisprudence being developed on the issue under study.

Advice No 4 (2012) on Indigenous peoples and the right to participate in decision making, with a focus on extractive industries
IAdvice No 3 (2012) on Indigenous peoples’ languages and cultures
Advice No 2 (2011) on Indigenous peoples and the right to participate in decision making
Advice No. 1 (2009) on the Indigenous Peoples’ Right to Education

THE DATES FOR THE SIXTH SESSION OF THE EXPERT MECHANISM ARE 8 – 12 JULY 2013 IN GENEVA AT THE UNITED NATIONS PALAIS DES NATIONS

How to get accreditation for the sessions of the Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples:

Click here for information and forms on HOW TO PARTICIPATE

According to paragraph 9 of resolution 6/36, the meeting of the Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples shall be open to the participation of observers through an open and transparent accreditation procedure in accordance with the rules of the Human Rights Council.

What we like about Geneva, and the United Nations Human Rights folks up there is that they understand the needs of representatives of indigenous peoples organizations and representatives of NGOs not in consultative status with ECOSOC, and you are allowed to register; (You do NOT need status to the UN).

Procedure

Those required to complete the online registration process to attend the next session of the Expert Mechanism are invited to complete the three steps accreditation procedure by:

Preparing a letter requesting accreditation, according to the description below, which can be uploaded to the online registration form.
Complete the online registration form, Spanish and French (include the letter requesting accreditation and the registration information).
Print, fill and bring to the session the Conference Registration Form (no need to be sent to the Secretariat).

NAMIBIA: INDIGENOUS SEMI-NOMADIC HIMBA AND ZEMBA MARCH IN PROTEST AGAINST DAM, MINING AND HUMAN RIGHTS VIOLATIONS

Saturday, November 24th, 2012

By Rebecca Sommer

Namibia, 23 Nov 2012: Hundreds of semi-nomadic Himba from Omuhonga and Epupa region marched today from their villages to Okanguati, a small town about 120 km away from Opuwo, to protest against Namibia’s human rights violations against them.

(Photo © Rebecca Sommer) Chief Hikuminae Kapika signing the invitation to the UN Special Rapporteur on the rights and fundamental freedoms of Indigenous Peoples to visit them

(Photo © Rebecca Sommer) Chief Hikuminae Kapika signing the invitation to the UN Special Rapporteur on the rights and fundamental freedoms of Indigenous Peoples to visit them

These violations, documented and signed by the Himba chiefs of the entire Himba territory (Kaokoland) in two historic Declarations have been submitted by Earth Peoples to the United Nations on February 23rd in 2012.

The Himba from Epupa and Omuhonga also wrote an invitation letter to the UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, which was forwarded to him on their behalf by Earth Peoples.

The United Nations Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights and fundamental freedoms of indigenous people, James Anaya, visited the Himba in September 2012, where a Himba spokesperson read aloud the “DECLARATION BY THE TRADITIONAL HIMBA LEADERS OF KAOKOLAND IN NAMIBIA” to him. You can read the UN Special Rapporteur’s statement about his country visit to Namibia here.

“We invited Namibian Broadcasting Cooperation (NBC) to come, but they refused to attend our protest manifestation” said Motjimbika Mutambo, a respected community leader from Himba village Omuhonga.“We handed our petition and demands to our elected Epupa Regional Councillor, the Honorable Muharukua, with the expectation that he will forward it to the President” Mutambo added.

Councillor Muharukua, who is a Herero, explains the problems of the Himba people in this Video with English subtites

(Photo © Rebecca Sommer) Muhapika Munjombara signing the "DECLARATION OF THE MOST AND DIRECTLY AFFECTED OVAHIMBA, OVATWA, OVATJIMBA AND OVAZEMBA AGAINST THE OROKAWE DAM IN THE BAYNES MOUNTAIN

(Photo © Rebecca Sommer) Muhapika Munjombara signing the Himba Declaration

“We don’t understand why we have to repeat ourselves over and over again, and the Government of Namibia is not listening to us, and is continuing to push for the construction of the dam in the Baynes Mountains without our consent. We collectively refused the money offered to our communities and families that would have to relocate” said Hikuminae Kapika, the Chief from the area of Epupa and Omuhonga. “We have these big mining companies making holes in our land, making roads where we graze our herds, and we don’t want that. We don’t know what they are digging out, we have no idea what they do to our water and land, and we don’t want them here. Nobody asked us for our permission.” He added.

“If the government is going to build the dam they better kill us first before they do that. This is our land. We are the original inhabitants and true owners. But since independence, the Government of Namibia has dispossessed us from our rights to our land, and our rights to decide what is being done with and on it.” Said Muhapika Munjombara.

Members of the indigenous peoples Zemba also attended the protest march. They also submitted through Earth Peoples their Human Rights violation Declaration to the United Nations.

In the Zemba Declaration,  it is stated:

Zemba/Ovazemba  (Photo © Rebecca Sommer)

Zemba/Ovazemba (Photo © Rebecca Sommer)

In the past our appointed leaders had to belong to the royal house, but that has changed over the time. Today, we elect our leaders. But to our great grievance, Namibia denies us not only our rightful place as legitimate Namibian citizens, with untrue claims that we are refugees from Angola, but also denies us our right to our land, and to choose our own representatives and leaders.

We demand that we get our right to choose our own representatives and leaders, and to be allowed to administer our internal affairs, including our territory and land, and to rule our affairs with our own customary laws and traditional courts.

We demand that the Government of Namibia recognizes without delay our chief as the legally recognized Zemba Traditional Authority.

TO READ:

DECLARATION OF THE ZEMBA PEOPLE OF NAMIBIA
DECLARATION OF THE MOST DIRECTLY AFFECTED OVAHIMBA, OVATWA, OVATJIMBA AND OVAZEMBA AGAINST THE OROKAWE DAM IN THE BAYNES MOUNTAINS
DECLARATION BY THE TRADITIONAL HIMBA LEADERS OF KAOKOLAND IN NAMIBIA

Himba women at human rights meeting with Earth Peoples (Photo © Rebecca Sommer)

Himba women at human rights meeting with Earth Peoples (Photo © Rebecca Sommer)

To watch Video of cultural Himba dance during one of Earth Peoples human rights awareness raising meetings in Omuhonga CLICK VIDEO
To watch other videos about Himba human rights complaints, click here

Himba Human Rights Protest March in Namibia (Photo©Earth Peoples)

Himba Human Rights Protest March in Namibia (Photo©Earth Peoples)

Himba + Zemba Human Rights Protest March in Namibia (Photo©Earth Peoples)

Himba + Zemba Human Rights Protest March in Namibia (Photo©Earth Peoples)

Himba + Zemba Human Rights Protest March in Namibia (Photo©Earth Peoples)

Himba + Zemba Human Rights Protest March in Namibia (Photo©Earth Peoples)

Himba + Zemba Human Rights Protest March in Namibia (Photo©Earth Peoples)

Himba + Zemba Human Rights Protest March in Namibia (Photo©Earth Peoples)

Himba + Zemba Human Rights Protest March in Namibia (Photo©Earth Peoples)

Himba + Zemba Human Rights Protest March in Namibia (Photo©Earth Peoples)

Himba + Zemba Human Rights Protest March in Namibia (Photo©Earth Peoples)

Himba + Zemba Human Rights Protest March in Namibia (Photo©Earth Peoples)

Himba + Zemba Human Rights Protest March in Namibia (Photo©Earth Peoples)

Himba + Zemba Human Rights Protest March in Namibia (Photo©Earth Peoples)

Himba + Zemba Human Rights Protest March in Namibia (Photo©Earth Peoples)

Himba + Zemba Human Rights Protest March in Namibia (Photo©Earth Peoples)

Himba + Zemba Human Rights Protest March in Namibia (Photo©Earth Peoples)

Himba + Zemba Human Rights Protest March in Namibia (Photo©Earth Peoples)

Himba + Zemba Human Rights Protest March in Namibia (Photo©Earth Peoples)

Himba + Zemba Human Rights Protest March in Namibia (Photo©Earth Peoples)

Himba + Zemba Human Rights Protest March in Namibia (Photo©Earth Peoples)

Himba + Zemba Human Rights Protest March in Namibia (Photo©Earth Peoples)

Himba + Zemba Human Rights Protest March in Namibia (Photo©Earth Peoples)

Himba + Zemba Human Rights Protest March in Namibia (Photo©Earth Peoples)

Himba + Zemba Human Rights Protest March in Namibia (Photo©Earth Peoples)

Himba + Zemba Human Rights Protest March in Namibia (Photo©Earth Peoples)

Zemba at Human Rights Protest March in Namibia (Photo©Earth Peoples)

Zemba at Human Rights Protest March in Namibia (Photo©Earth Peoples)

Himba + Zemba Human Rights Protest March in Namibia (Photo©Earth Peoples)

Himba + Zemba Human Rights Protest March in Namibia (Photo©Earth Peoples)

Himba + Zemba Human Rights Protest March in Namibia (Photo©Earth Peoples)

Himba + Zemba Human Rights Protest March in Namibia (Photo©Earth Peoples)