Posts Tagged ‘INDÍGENAS ALTAMIRA PARÁ Xingy barragem Belo Monte’

INDIGENOUS PEOPLES REGION ALTAMIRA OCCUPY BELO MONTE DAM

Saturday, June 23rd, 2012

Since yesterday, Thursday 21/6/2012, the indigenous peoples affected by the hydroelectric dam Belo Monte occupy an area of the dams construction. They decided for the occupation in order to express their dissatisfaction at the disregard of their rights and the non-compliance with the (construction agreements) conditions, especially those relating to the Indigenous peoples. Organized by themselves and with their own resources, they occupied “Pimental”, and the work-in-progress site that is intended to allow construction. The demonstration is peaceful, and the Indigenous peoples request the presence of government representatives and the Northern Energy corporation.

Yesterday, the Earth’s Indigenous Xikrin Trench-Bacajá and Juruna Paquiçamba came to the cofferdam by river, from its IT, which are downstream of the dam in the region that suffer from drought in the project area called the Low Flow Xingu. Ships also left Altamira, where some Indians arrived by road from the more distant villages, and from where indigenous people reside or remained in the city. Are expected the Arara of the Big Bend of the Xingu and representatives of all indigenous lands in the region, coming from Iriri and Xingu rivers upstream of Altamira, in addition to the townspeople. This morning depart Paracana leaders to meet those who are already camped in the cofferdam.

The Indians are unhappy with the situation, since the conditions that should precede the works are not being adequately met in their lands and Altamira. Besides those that affect us all – as the delay in investing in the infrastructure of the city, health services and education and basic sanitation are increasingly burdened with the population increase already felt throughout the region – the indigenous peoples are concerned with the delay in implementation of the Basic Environmental Plan – indigenous component (PBA), which should establish and implement programs of compensation and mitigation of impacts already felt in the region by the Indians, with the delay in delivery of the Xikrin Complementary Studies River Bacajá , which for now have only been presented in the villages, and would allow a better scaling of impacts on this river and the Xikrin, and guarantee the definition of compensation programs and mitigation of these impacts, especially to predict that the drought will suffer from its river construction of the project, by ignorance of the PBA by the Indians, which is asked more and better performances for all to understand, the delay in defining the situation of indigenous land tenure Land Wanga, Paquiçamba, 17 km from the Juruna and Cachoeira Seca, be vague the transposition system of the dam and the fear that they are isolated from Altamira, a town where the main services that meet them (health, education, offices FUNAI); not authorize the construction of more roads as an alternative to river transport currently used by the Indians and that will be hampered by implementation of the dam and drought (reduced flow) of the riverbed, and the lack of necessary investment and infrastructure prior to work in the affected villages, such as to ensure the abstraction of drinking water in villages in the Volta Grande do Xingu, in which the water of the river, until then consumed by the population, is already muddy and unhealthy due to construction.

BELO MONTE: While Dam company continues construction of dam – Indigenous Peoples suffer: insufficient health care and overflow of hospital

Friday, April 6th, 2012

By Rebecca Sommer

While workers are protesting bad work conditions at the construction site of the Belo Monte dam, in Brazil, Altamira, the indigenous population of the region is struggling with ever increasing negative impacts directly caused by the dam’s company NESA.

It was always understood, and actually one of the conditions before any construction work was to be granted by the Brazilian Government, that the infrastructure of sleepy jungle town Altamira had to be adequately addressed, to avoid human suffering due to the increasing population growth caused by thousands and thousands of workers settling there.

In the case of the indigenous peoples in Altamira, they do suffer. Unnecessarily, because of ruthlessness, corruption, and lack of ethics.

While the FUNAI had filled its pockets with moneys from NESA (nothing else but one governmental

Araweté (PHOTO © REBECCA SOMMER)

Araweté (PHOTO © REBECCA SOMMER)

branch shifting moneys back and forth with the other), that where supposed to directly benefit the indigenous populations, and while the indigenous peoples have been bribed, divided and lied at by NESA high level employees about the Belo Monte dam’s impact, about the access to benefits, projects, and moneys that they would receive, that would reduce not only the (by purpose underestimated) negative impact but would also help them to prosper and have a better life than before, nothing of that has actually taken place.

The opposite. The Belo Monte dam construction is moving along, while the indigenous peoples are dealing with growing health problems, an over spilling hospital that has always been infamous for its notorious lack of professionals, medicine, appropriately trained staff, space, and insufficient staff.

CASAI, a place set aside to house sick indigenous patients, is not only beyond being overloaded, the indigenous health care facility has only one functioning car to transport the indigenous patients back and forth to sometimes months long delayed appointments with the hospital’s doctors.

Worse, the same car is also used to pick up sick patients from remote indigenous villages. We are talking about a possible two days ride.

“A very sick person has to wait for weeks to actually see a doctor. The hospital is extremely overfilled, it is scary. Sometime a person could be cured in no time, if attended, but after weeks of waiting their condition is often much much worse.” Said Ngrenhdjan Xikrin, from the Indigenous Kayapo Xikrin organization ABEX “Only one car is available to pick up or return patients, bringing them to the hospital, back to the villages, to CASAI, to the Casa do Indio. Imagine how much we are suffering right now, the situation is much worse, beyond description.” She added.

Where did all the money go, that NESA, the hydroelectric dam company, claims to have paid already to those governmental branches that are supposed to use those moneys to improve the health care situation of the indigenous peoples?

16th of April the indigenous leaders have once again a meeting with the relevant authorities. How many more, before they are finally heard?

Three Indigenous Nations in Altamira area, Para, signed REDD contracts with an untrustworthy individual, Benedito Millleo Junior, representative fromTopoGeo.

Tuesday, March 27th, 2012

By Rebecca Sommer

I was in the city of Altamira, the Amazon area in the state of Para, preparing to leave the next day. It was with a knot in my throat when I promised the young chief of one of the three indigenous nations in this area that had signed REDD contracts, not to reveal their identity.

For years I have tried to inform indigenous peoples about the lies and wrongs that one day soon they will be told in order to obtain their consent for REDD projects on their indigenous territory.

But it is indeed a very abstract issue, and unfortunately, my explanation had no effect on this particular young chief, and other young leaders that were standing in a circle around me, with their REDD contract signed, in their hand, in June 2011.

They were worried, thus the reason why they approached me with the contract. They trusted me enough to allow me to photograph it. (To view the original contract in Portuguese with the names that could identify the indigenous nation removed CLICK HERE)

The young leaders wanted to know what the contract actually said, as they admitted, it wasn’t exactly clear to them.

The first thing that I spotted was that the contract was signed by an individual and not by a company. Benedito Milleo Junior.

The chief showed me Benedito Milleo Junior’s business card.
Business card from carbon cowboy "Benedito Millleo Junior", TopoGeo (Photo © Rebecca Sommer) [TopoGeo | Surveying and Geo-referenced GIS | Annotation Legal Reserve IBAMA and IAP | Accredited at INCRA under Code APO | Benedito Milleo Junior | Agronomist | Federal Judicial Expert | CREA 13.062/D-PR]

I asked the young leaders why they thought he had signed as an individual, while they had to sign with their positions, under their Indigenous Association.

They did not know why.

I ask them if they knew this (sinister) gentlemen, and asked about the location of his companies’ office.

“He lives in a rather shabby house in Altamira, with no sign or logo of his company. We wondered about that. But he promised to pay us a lot of the money in June 2012.” said the young chief.

However, when we went to the location, the neighbors informed us that the carbon cowboy and his assistant had vacated the house, and that we were not the first ones to look for them.

The neighbors said many small landowners would come every day, with the goal to sign “the contract that would make them rich”. Further, during the time Mr. Benedito Milleo Junior from TopoGeo had resided next door, hundreds of contracts had been signed in the region, and sometimes there had been a line of waiting folks, in front of Benedito Juniors’ house, that was in a shabby condition, with paint peeling off of it.

The second issue I raised with the indigenous young leaders was the language of the contract, the way it was actually written. I told them that Portuguese is not my mother language, but the text was confusing, without comas and proper punctuation, in my view leaving some sentences seriously unclear.

I told them that I am not a lawyer, but that in my view important parts have been left out in the contract, such as who will pay whom. I couldn’t find clear articulation who would pay them. This articulation was left out by Mr. Benedito Milleo Junior.

However, what was not left out in the contract was that the indigenous nation was charged for all the costs. Including the costs of the project and the costs that the broker, Mr. Junior himself would incur. Do these costs include promotion of the sale of carbon credits, his office expenses, travel costs, gasoline, utilities website administration and whatnot?

I asked them to imagine what he could charge them for, as this wasn’t clarified in the contract.

“We don’t know, he didn’t say,” responded the young chief, while the others were looking down, poking their toes in the sand.

I told them that in my view this man is a criminal, and that they will not only not receive any payments, but also won’t be able to trace the carbon credits sold on behalf of their forest.

I explained to them the problems of REDD, the lies and wrongs, but to no effect.

“We wait for June 2012, and hope he will pay,” they said. “And please, stick to your promise and don’t reveal our identity.”

I wasn’t able to meet the Elders and the traditional chief of this indigenous nation, to which I had the year before explained the problems with REDD, with not only the young chiefs present, but that of the entire community. Yet I firmly believe that I know what the Elders and old chief would have told me.

I have attempted to translate the contract from Portuguese to English as accurately as possible. It is as follows:(download original here)

PRIVATE CONTRACT TO PROVIDE PROFESSIONAL TECHNICAL SERVICES AND PARTNERSHIP FOR CARBON CREDIT AND AVOIDED DEFORESTATION

For this particular instrument of RENDERED PROFESSIONAL TECHNICAL SERVICES, that makes one side the prominent CONTRACTOR: BENEDITO MILLEO JUNIOR, Brazilian citizen, married, agronomist, holder of identity card RG. No1.494.076-6-SSP-PR and CPF / MF. under the 320838409-25, resident Marechal Candido Rondon Street No 911, center, GUAIRA-PR.,
On the other hand the prospective Contracted: INDIGENOUS ASSOCIATION XXXXXX, Civil Society, CNPJ XXXX XXXXXX Location In the municipality of Rio XXX ALTAMIRA, to the State. THE AREA WITH A TOTAL OF XXXX HECTARES, THE INDIGENOUS LAND XXXX, Located in the municipality of ALTMAIRA, state PARA.
1) THE CONTRACTOR AND THE CONTRACTED will receive on both sides the importance of 50% (FIFTY PERCENT) FOR EACH OF CARBON CREDITS SOLD IN THE Stock Exchange OF CHICAGO – U.S. and or STOCK EXCHANGE LONDON – ENGLAND, NATIONAL BANKS OR INTERNATIONAL BANKS or anyone interested in Buying, AND THE COSTS ON BEHALF OF THE PROJECT AND PLACEMENT FOR SALE IS ON ACCOUNT OF THE CONTRACTEE, AND THE PROJECT OF CARBON CREDIT and avoided deforestation, the OWNER agrees to not deforest THE AREA OF THE PROJECT BEING THE TOTAL OF NATIVE FOREST DETERMINED IN THE UPDATED SATELITE PICTURE OF THE ABOVE CITED PROPERTY, GEOREFERENCED ACCORDING TO INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS, ON BEHALF OF CONTRACTEE THE AMOUNT OF RS 4,000,000.00 (Four million dollars) paid WHEN RECEIVING THE 1rst part of the payment of Carbon Credit and Avoided Deforestation. The contracted shall pay 10% (ten percent) INCOME TAX and 10 (ten percent) BROKERS COMMISSION FOR THE SALE OF CARBON CREDITS. FOR THE PERIOD OF 25 (TWENTY FIVE) YEARS. THEIR SUCCESSORS SHALL COMPLY WITH THIS AGREEMENT, IF THE TERM IS EXTENDED BY 40 (FORTY YEARS) OR HIGHER THIS CONTRACTS DEADLINE EXTENDED
2) Therefore we are under contract, having signed this particular instrument in two identical copies and form
ALTAMIRA – PA, JUNE 28, 2011

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CONTRACTOR – JUNIOR BENEDITO MILLEO

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PRESIDENT OF THE INDIGENOUS XXXX

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VICE PRESIDENT OF THE INDIGENOUS XXXX

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VICE PRESIDENT OF THE INDIGENOUS XXXX

CARTA ABERTA DOS POVOS INDÍGENAS DO ALTAMIRA, PARÁ

Monday, November 21st, 2011

CARTA ABERTA DOS POVOS INDÍGENAS DO MÉDIO XINGUA

Nós povos indígenas do Médio Xingu reunidos em Assembléia Geral na cidade de Altamira nos dias 08 a 11 de Novembro de 2011. Vimos por meio desta manifestar o nosso descontentamento com o rumo que a política indigenista vem tomando em nosso País nos últimos dias, sobretudo em nosso caso específico sobre a construção da Hidrelétrica de Belo Monte. As condicionantes relacionadas ao nosso povo não estão sendo cumpridas pelo governo e mesmo assim as obras continuam avançando sem considerar isso. As oitivas indígenas que nunca aconteceram e o STF no último julgamento da ação do MPF deu causa ganha para o governo sem ao menos nos ouvir, não fomos ouvidos sobre a construção e nem no processo deste julgamento.

Com todas essas coisas ruins acontecendo contra o nosso povo o governo ainda decreta uma lei, mais uma vez sem nos consultar prévia e informadamente, contra as demarcações das terras indígenas, colocando estados e municípios tradicionalmente inimigos dos povos indígenas para participar do processo de demarcação que só pode iniciar com autorização da própria presidente Dilma Roussef, ao mesmo tempo em que cria uma comissão no Congresso Nacional para discutir a liberação de mineração em terras indígenas e cria outra lei de morte para os povos indígenas do Brasil que facilita a implementação de grandes empreendimentos em áreas indígenas, diminuindo a área de influência dos impactos destes empreendimentos.

Não bastando essas violações de nossos direitos ainda estamos inseridos em um processo injusto de listas de compras com a Norte Energia S.A onde nosso direito de escolher o que queremos não é considerado pela FUNAI e nem pela Norte Energia. Precisamos convencer a FUNAI de nossas necessidades e nos submetermos a todo tipo de humilhação para termos nossos direitos respeitados.

Tendo em vista esta situação caótica em que vivemos no lugar onde está prestes a se concretizar a maior obra do PAC do governo Dilma Roussef , a terceira maior hidrelétrica do mundo “Belo Monte”,onde nossa continuidade como povos originários deste território está sendo seriamente ameaçada.Portanto,reivindicamos a presença da Presidente da FUNAI Márcio Meira, do representante da Casa Civil, do MPF,do MPE, da Defensoria Pública, do IBAMA, da Norte Energia, do INCRA, da ELETROBRAS para uma reunião em Altamira no dia 25 de Novembro de 2011, de acordo com o que foi acordado com a Sra. Rosângela Barros, assessora do presidente da FUNAI ,com as lideranças e guerreiros de todas as trinta e quatro aldeias e as associações indígenas da região de Altamira, que anseiam por soluções aos problemas provocados pelo empreendimento de Belo Monte, exigimos explicações pelo não cumprimento das condicionantes e da garantia dos nossos direitos constitucionais por parte dos órgãos de governo responsáveis e Norte Energia S/A.

Assinam as lideranças :