Archive for December, 2008

Closing Statement of the International Indigenous Peoples’ Forum on Climate Change

Sunday, December 14th, 2008

High Level Segment – 14th Conference of the Parties, Agenda Item 8 and CMP Agenda Item 9,
UN Framework Conference on Climate Change, Poznań, Poland
12 December 2008
Closing Statement of the International Indigenous Peoples’ Forum on Climate Change
Presented by Mr. Tom Goldtooth, Indigenous Environmental Network

Mr. Chair and Distinguished Delegates,
The Shared Vision of this Climate Change Convention must observe and implement the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples adopted by the UN General Assembly in 2007. As the UNFCCC is a process under the umbrella of the UN system, the denial of full and effective Indigenous peoples’ participation in the UNFCCC discussions is an affront to those rights granted only a year ago. It is urgent that the UNFCCC be amended as soon as possible to make its process and provisions consistent with the spirit and intent of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and allow Indigenous peoples to express their views on all aspects of the Convention.

More specifically, language in the annex of the SBSTA 29, Agenda 5 document that merely mentions “full and effective participation of indigenous people (without the “s”)” is insufficient and offensive and creates a major obstacle for recognizing Indigenous peoples’ rights in any REDD scheme. Can full and effective participation even exist if rights are denied? The omission of a concrete reference to Indigenous Peoples with an “S”, omission of the word, our rights and the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in the REDD document could cause gross and systematic human rights abuses including forced displacements. We recall the UN‐REDD Framework Programme that was launched by the UN Secretary General at the General Assembly’s 63rd Session acknowledges in its Framework Document that REDD could undermine Indigenous peoples and local communities’ rights to the usage and ownership of their lands and marginalize communal‐use rights. The International Indigenous Peoples Forum on Climate Change stand by our demand for an immediate suspension of all REDD initiatives and carbon market schemes. Cut emissions at source ‐ No REDD.

Mr. Chair, as the Convention moves forward, we call to your attention the human rights violations caused by the Clean Development Mechanisms (CDM) and other carbon trading and carbon offset regimes. During this Convention you have witnessed growing concerns questioning the legitimacy of CDM. Any further expansion of the CDM is an excuse to avoid real emissions reductions. The CDM and the carbon market are instruments that commodify the atmosphere, promote privatization and concentrate resources in the hands of a few, taking away the rights of many to live with dignity. CDM
are not a mechanism for mitigating climate change. It is not just “carbon” or pollution that is being traded, but people’s lives.

Our indigenous brothers and sisters have traveled here from the four points of the world, in good faith and with a desire to share with world leaders our traditional knowledge towards developing a shared vision as we prepare for Copenhagen in 2009. We have repeatedly requested the Conference of the Parties here in the great city of Poznań to establish an Expert Group on Climate Change and Indigenous Peoples. If accepted by COP 14, this will send a strong signal of the intent of this Conference process to include those peoples most under direct threat from climate change. The fate of more than a dozen small islands States, whose population is 90% indigenous and the reality of our brothers and sisters of the Arctic regions already hangs in balance.

The UNFCCC must set into action a new economic paradigm moving away from an unsustainable fossil fuel economy. We must transform the values of commerce and consumerism to those of conservation, cooperation and sharing. The acceleration of global warming means that, Annex 1 countries must reevaluate their Bali commitment in emissions reduction levels. Credible scientists and climate studies are now urging a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 80% by 2020, below 1990 levels, and a
reduction of CO2 atmospheric concentrations to 350 ppm in order to prevent the “tipping point”. Unless we stabilize energy use immediately, we face dire social and economic chaos. A growing number of analyses now suggest that far greater reductions at source accomplished within a much tighter time frame are needed. The climate crisis demands drastic international and national action, including implementation of self‐government and treaties negotiated between Indigenous Peoples and the states in which they reside.

We urge that all people of the world renew their understanding of their relationship with the sacredness of Mother Earth. Indigenous Peoples are prepared to renew their responsibilities, and we urge others to do the same. We will never have peace as long as we make war against Mother Earth.
Mr. Chair and Governmental Delegates,
Thank you.

VIDEO:Indigenous Peoples Not Allowed To Speak at UNFCCC COP 14

Sunday, December 14th, 2008

CLICK HERE TO WATCH VIDEO:

(filmed by Rebecca Sommer © SommerFilms for EARTH PEOPLES)

Below the statement, which was not read in the Plenary room:
Statement of the International Indigenous Peoples Forum on Climate Change
SBSTA
December 10, 2008
Chair,
We acknowledge the efforts of some Parties who have supported and worked with us to reflect our rights and our full and effective participation in this COP14. However, we DENOUNCE those Parties, including Canada, the United States, New Zealand and Australia who continue to exercise, outmoded, outdated colonial power structures that the rest of the world left behind decades ago.
We remind the parties that UNFCCC is NOT a consensus document AND perhaps a time has come for a simple majority vote that lets these four nations know how isolated their position is.
On the 60th Anniversary of the adoption by the United Nations of the Universal Declaration on Human Rights IT IS APALLING that any UNITED NATIONS BODY is still denies extending the Rights enshrined in this document to the Indigenous Peoples of the planet. It is a abrogation of BOTH the Universal Declaration on Human Rights and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP).
Reference to the draft text ON SBSTA 29 agenda item 5, on REDD (Reducing emissions from deforestation in developing countries: approaches to stimulate action]. In the annex of this document, 1 (c ), we are profoundly disappointed that the Indigenous Peoples fundamental rights, INCLUDING the UNDRIP and other existing Human Rights instruments (Convention ILO169) are not included in the operative paragraphs of the latest document of SBSTA29 .
We, are just not ONE SINGLE indigenous people, as the document states. WE ARE a multitude of indigenous Peoples from multiple countries, with multiple languages, diverse cultures and background and experiences. TO REDUCE all this, to the concept of a singular unitary experience IS A DENIAL OF THE RICHNESS OF DIVERSITY THAT EXIST WITHIN, the framework of indigenous peoples as a collective of individual nations.
For this reason, WE, appeal to the UNFCCC and Parties take affirmative action to reaffirm the rights of Indigenous Peoples as codified in UNDRIP and other relevant Human Rights instruments (EG. Convention ILO 169). Any decision or measure that will be adopted at this COP, in particular the REDD process, must reaffirm the principle of free, prior and informed consent of Indigenous Peoples AND OUR RIGHT of the Indigenous Peoples TO SAY NO,. In that regard, Indigenous Peoples must be included as parties to official decisions, should be centrally involved in and benefit from, all climate change and forest programs and policies at all levels to ensure that they deliver justice and equity and contribute to sustainable development, biodiversity protection, and climate change mitigation and adaptation.
We, demand an IMMEDIATE SUSPENSION of all REDD initiatives and carbon market schemes in Indigenous Peoples territories UNTIL Indigenous Peoples Rights are fully RECOGNIZED, PROTECTED AND PROMOTED.
Thank you.

Indigenous Peoples Denounce Rights Exclusion at UN Climate Talks

Wednesday, December 10th, 2008

INDIGENOUS PEOPLES, LOCAL COMMUNITIES AND NGOs OUTRAGED AT THE REMOVAL OF RIGHTS FROM UNFCCC DECISION ON REDD

IMG_4356
Photp©Ben Powless

Poznan, Poland– 9 December 2008

We, the undersigned representatives of indigenous peoples, local communities and non-governmental organizations monitoring the progress of negotiations in Poznan are outraged that the United States, Canada, Australia and New Zealand opposed the inclusion of recognition of the rights of indigenous peoples and local communities in a decision on REDD (Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation) drafted today by government delegates at the UN Climate Conference.

These four countries (often known as the ‘CANZUS Group’) want to include REDD in the future climate agreement, but they oppose protecting the rights of the indigenous and forest peoples who will be directly affected by REDD measures. In discussions today, these countries insisted that the word “rights” and references to the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples be struck from the text.

This is totally unacceptable for indigenous peoples, local communities and supporting NGOs, as the forests which are being targeted for REDD are those which indigenous peoples have sustained and protected for thousands of years. The rights of forests peoples to continue playing this role and being rewarded for doing so has to be recognized by the UNFCCC Parties. Any REDD mechanism that does not respect and protect the rights of indigenous peoples and local communities will fail.

We therefore demand that an unequivocal reference to rights and to the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples be reinserted into the Draft COP14 Decision text on REDD.

Poznan, December 9, 2008

EVO MORALES – Noviembre 28 del 2008

Saturday, December 6th, 2008

Cambio climático:

Salvemos al planeta del capitalismo

Hermanas y hermanos:

Hoy, nuestra Madre Tierra está enferma. Desde el principio del siglo XXI hemos vivido los años más calientes de los últimos mil años. El calentamiento global está provocando cambios bruscos en el clima: el retroceso de los glaciares y la disminución de los casquetes polares; el aumento del nivel del mar y la inundación de territorios costeros en cuyas cercanías vive el 60% de la población mundial; el incremento de los procesos de desertificación y la disminución de fuentes de agua dulce; una mayor frecuencia de desastres naturales que sufren las comunidades del planeta; la extinción de  especies animales y vegetales; y la propagación de enfermedades en zonas que antes estaban libres de las mismas.

Una de las consecuencias más trágicas del cambio climático es que algunas naciones y territorios están condenadas a desaparecer por la elevación del nivel del mar.

Todo empezó con la revolución industrial de 1750 que dio inicio al sistema capitalista. En dos siglos y medio, los países llamados “desarrollados” han consumido gran parte de los combustibles fósiles creados en cinco millones de siglos.

La competencia y la sed de ganancia sin límites del sistema capitalista están destrozando el planeta. Para el capitalismo no somos seres humanos sino consumidores. Para el capitalismo no existe la madre tierra sino las materias primas. El capitalismo es la fuente de las asimetrías y desequilibrios en el mundo. Genera lujo, ostentación y derroche para unos pocos mientras millones mueren de hambre en el mundo. En manos del capitalismo todo se convierte en mercancía: el agua, la tierra, el genoma humano, las culturas ancestrales, la justicia, la ética, la muerte… la vida misma. Todo, absolutamente todo, se vende y se compra en el capitalismo. Y hasta el propio “cambio climático” se ha convertido en un negocio.

El “cambio climático” ha colocado a toda la humanidad frente a una gran disyuntiva: continuar por el camino del capitalismo y la muerte, o emprender el camino de la armonía con la naturaleza y el respeto a la vida.

En el Protocolo de Kyoto de 1997, los países desarrollados y de economías en transición se comprometieron a reducir sus emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero por lo menos en un 5% por debajo de los niveles de 1990, con la implementación de diferentes instrumentos entre los cuales predominan los mecanismos de mercado.

Hasta el 2006 los gases de efecto invernadero, lejos de reducirse, se han incrementado en un 9.1% en relación a los niveles de 1990, evidenciándose también de esta manera el incumplimiento de los compromisos de los países desarrollados.

Los mecanismos de mercado aplicados en los países en desarrollo no han logrado una disminución significativa de las emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero.

Así como el mercado es incapaz de regular el sistema financiero y productivo del mundo, el mercado tampoco es capaz de regular las emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero y sólo generará un gran negocio para los agentes financieros y las grandes corporaciones.

El planeta es mucho más importante que las bolsas de Wall Street y del mundo

Mientras Estados Unidos y la Unión Europea destinan 4.100 billones de dólares para salvar a los banqueros de una crisis financiera que ellos mismos  provocaron, a los programas vinculados al cambio climatico les destinan 313 veces menos, es decir, sólo 13 billones de dólares.

Los recursos para el cambio climático estan mal distribuidos. Se destinan más recursos para reducir las emisiones (mitigación) y menos para contrarestar los efectos del cambio climático que sufrimos todos los países (adaptación). La gran mayoría de los recursos fluyen a los paises que más han contaminado y no a los países que más hemos preservado el medio ambiente. El 80% de los proyectos del Mecanismo de Desarrollo Limpio se han concentrado en sólo cuatro países emergentes.

La lógica capitalista promueve la paradoja de que los sectores que más contribuyeron a deteriorar el medio ambiente son los que más se benefician de los programas vinculados al cambio climático.

Asimismo, la transferencia de tecnología y financiamiento para un desarrollo limpio y sostenible de los países del sur se ha quedado en los discursos.

La próxima cumbre sobre el Cambio Climático en Copenhagen debe permitirnos dar un salto si queremos salvar a la madre tierra y a la humanidad. Para ello planteamos las siguientes propuestas para el proceso que va de Poznan a Copenhagen:

Atacar las causas estructurales del cambio climático

1)     Discutir sobre las causas estructurales del cambio climático. Mientras no cambiemos el sistema capitalista por un sistema basado en la complementariedad, la solidaridad y la armonía entre los pueblos y la naturaleza, las medidas que adoptemos serán paliativos que tendrán un carácter limitado y precario. Para nosotros, lo que ha fracasado es el modelo del “vivir mejor”, del desarrollo ilimitado, de la industrialización sin fronteras, de la modernidad que desprecia la historia, de la acumulación creciente a costa del otro y de la naturaleza. Por eso propugnamos el Vivir Bien, en armonía con los otros seres humanos y con nuestra Madre Tierra.

2)     Los países desarrollados necesitan controlar sus patrones consumistas —de lujo y derroche—, especialmente el consumo excesivo de combustibles fósiles. Los subsidios a los combustibles fósiles, que ascienden a 150-250 billones de dólares, deben ser progresivamente eliminados. Es fundamental desarrollar energías alternativas como la energía solar, la geotérmica, la energía eólica y la hidroeléctrica en pequeña y mediana escala.

3)     Los agrocombustibles no son una alternativa porque anteponen la producción de alimentos para  el transporte frente a la producción de alimentos para los seres humanos. Los agrocumbustibles amplían la frontera agrícola destruyendo los bosques y la biodiversidad, generan monocultivos, promueven la concentración de la tierra, deterioran los suelos, agotan las fuentes de agua, contribuyen al alza del precio de los alimentos y, en muchos casos, consumen más energía de la que generan.

Compromisos sustanciales de reducción de emisiones que se cumplan

4)     Cumplir estrictamente hasta el 2012 el compromiso de los países desarrollados de reducir las emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero por lo menos en un 5% por debajo de los niveles de 1990. No es aceptable que los países que contaminaron históricamente el planeta hablen de reducciones mayores para el futuro incumpliendo sus compromisos presentes.

5)     Establecer nuevos compromisos mínimos para los países desarrollados del 40% para el 2020 y del 90% para el 2050 de reducción de gases de efecto invernadero tomando como punto de partida las emisiones de 1990. Estos compromisos mínimos de reducción deben hacerse de manera interna en los países desarrollados y no a través de mecanismos flexibles de mercado que permiten la compra de Certificados de Reducción de Emisiones para seguir contaminando en su propio país. Asimismo, se deben establecer mecanismos de monitoreo, información y verificación transparentes, accesibles al público, para garantizar el cumplimiento de dichos compromisos.

6)     Los paises en desarrollo que no son responsables de la contaminación histórica deben preservar el espacio necesario para implementar un desarrollo alternativo y sostenible que no repita los errores del proceso de industrialización salvaje que nos ha llevado a la actual situación. Para asegurar este proceso, los países en desarrollo necesitan, como prerrequisito, el financiamiento y transferencia de tecnología.

Un Mecanismo Financiero Integral para atender la deuda ecológica

7)     En reconocimiento a la deuda ecológica histórica que tienen con el planeta, los países desarrollados deben crear un Mecanismo Financiero Integral para apoyar a los países en desarrollo en la implementación de sus planes y programas de adaptación y mitigación del cambio climático; en la innovación, desarrollo y transferencia de tecnología; en la conservación y mejoramiento de sus sumideros y depósitos; en las acciones de respuesta a los graves desastres naturales provocados por el cambio climático; y en la ejecución de planes de desarrollo sostenibles y amigables con la naturaleza.

8)     Este Mecanismo Financiero Integral, para ser efectivo, debe contar por lo menos con un aporte del 1% del PIB de los países desarrollados y contar con otros ingresos provenientes de impuestos a los hidrocarburos, a las transacciones financieras, al transporte marítimo y aéreo, y a las utilidades de las empresas transnacionales.

9)     El financiamiento que aporten los países desarrollados debe ser adicional a la Ayuda Oficial al Desarrollo (ODA), a la ayuda bilateral y/o canalizada a través de organismos que no sean los de Naciones Unidas. Cualquier financiamiento fuera de la CMNUCC no podrá ser considerado como la aplicación de los compromisos de los países desarrollados bajo la Convención.

10)  El financiamiento tiene que ir a los planes o programa nacionales de los Estados y no a proyectos que están bajo la lógica del mercado.

11)  El financiamiento no debe concentrarse sólo en algunos países desarrollados sino que tiene que priorizar a los países que menos han contribuido a las emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero, aquellos que preservan la naturaleza y/o que más sufren los impactos del cambio climático.

12)  El Mecanismo de Financiamiento Integral debe estar bajo la cobertura de las Naciones Unidas y no del Fondo Global del Medio Ambiente (GEF) y sus intermediarios como el Banco Mundial o los Bancos Regionales; su administración debe ser colectiva, transparente y no burocrática. Sus decisiones deben ser tomadas por todos los países miembros, en especial los países en desarrollo, y no sólo por los donantes o las burocracias administradoras.

Transferencia de tecnología a los países en desarrollo

13)  Las innovaciones y tecnologías relacionadas con el cambio climático deben ser de dominio público y no estar bajo un régimen privado de monopolio de patentes que obstaculiza y encarece su transferencia a los países en desarrollo.

14)  Los productos que son fruto del financiamiento público para innovación y desarrollo de tecnologías deben ser colocados bajo el dominio público y no bajo un régimen privado de patentes de forma tal que sean de libre acceso para los países en desarrollo.

15)  Incentivar y mejorar el sistema de licencias voluntarias y obligatorias para que todos los países puedan acceder a los productos ya patentados en forma rápida y libres de costo. Los países desarrollados no pueden tratar las patentes o derechos de propiedad intelectual como si fueran algo “sagrado” que tiene que ser mantenido a cualquier costo. El régimen de flexibilidad que existe para los derechos de propiedad intelectual, cuando se trata de graves problemas a la salud pública, debe ser adaptado y ampliado sustancialmente para curar a la Madre Tierra.

16)  Recoger y promover las prácticas de armonía con la naturaleza de los pueblos indígenas que a lo largo de los siglos se han demostrado sostenibles.

Adaptación y mitigación con la participación de todo el pueblo

17)  Impulsar acciones, programas y planes de mitigación y adaptación con la participación de las comunidades locales y pueblos indígenas en el marco del pleno respeto e implementación de la Declaración de las Naciones Unidas sobre los Derechos de los Pueblos Indígenas. El mejor instrumento para enfrentar el reto del cambio climático no son los mecanismos de mercado, sino los seres humanos organizados, conscientes, movilizados y dotados de identidad.

18)  La reducción de las emisiones de la deforestación y degradación de bosques REDD, debe estar basada en un mecanismo de compensación directa de países desarrollados a países en desarrollo, a través de una implementación soberana que asegure una participación amplia de comunidades locales y pueblos indígenas, y un mecanismo de monitoreo, reporte y verificación transparentes y públicos.

Una ONU del Medio Ambiente y el Cambio Climático

19)  Necesitamos una Organización Mundial del Medio Ambiente y el Cambio Climático a la cuál se subordinen las organizaciones comerciales y financieras multilaterales para que promueva un modelo distinto de desarrollo amigable con la naturaleza y que resuelva los graves problemas de la pobreza. Esta organización tiene que contar con mecanismos efectivos de seguimiento, verificación y sanción para hacer cumplir los presentes y futuros acuerdos.

20)  Es fundamental transformar estructuralmente la Organización Mundial del Comercio, el Banco Mundial, el Fondo Monetario Internacional y el sistema económico internacional en su conjunto, a fin de garantizar un comercio justo y complementario, un financiamiento sin condicionamientos para un desarrollo sostenible que no derroche los recursos naturales y los combustibles fósiles en los procesos de producción, comercio y transporte de productos.

En este proceso de negociaciones hacia Copenhagen es fundamental garantizar instancias activas de participación a nivel nacional, regional y mundial de todos nuestros pueblos, en particular de los sectores más afectados como los pueblos indígenas que siempre impulsaron la defensa de la Madre Tierra.

La humanidad es capaz de salvar al planeta si recupera los principios de la solidaridad, la complementariedad y la armonía con la naturaleza, en contraposición al imperio de la competencia, la ganancia y el consumismo de los recursos naturales.

Noviembre 28 del 2008

Evo Morales Ayma

Presidente de Bolivia


Debido al fenomeno de la “Niña”,  que se produce con mayor frecuencia por efecto del cambio climatico, Bolivia ha perdido en el 2007, el 4 % de su PIB.

Conocido como Mecanismo de Desarrollo Limpio.

Actualmente sólo hay un Fondo de Adaptación de cerca a 500 millones de dólares para más de 150 paises en vías de desarrollo. Según el Secretariado de la UNFCCC se requieren 171 billones de dólares para adaptación y 380 billones de dólares para mitigación.

Informe de Stern

Protocolo de Kioto, Art. 3.

El porcentaje del 1 % del PIB ha sido sugerido por el Informe Stern y representa menos de 700 billones de dólares al año.

Según la UNCTAD (1998) en algunas paises desarrollados el financiamiento público contribuye con el 40 % de los recursos para la innovación y desarrollo de tecnología.

EVO MORALES statement at the UNFCCC

Saturday, December 6th, 2008

Climate Change:

Save the Planet from Capitalism

Sisters and brothers:

Today, our Mother Earth is ill. From the beginning of the 21st century we have lived the hottest years of the last thousand years. Global warming is generating abrupt changes in the weather: the retreat of glaciers and the decrease of the polar ice caps; the increase of the sea level and the flooding of coastal areas, where approximately 60% of the world population live; the increase in the processes of desertification and the decrease of fresh water sources; a higher frequency in natural disasters that the communities of the earth suffer; the extinction of animal and vegetal species; and the spread of diseases in areas that before were free from those diseases.

One of the most tragic consequences of the climate change is that some nations and territories are the condemned to disappear by the increase of the sea level.

Everything began with the industrial revolution in 1750, which gave birth to the capitalist system. In two and a half centuries, the so called “developed” countries have consumed a large part of the fossil fuels created over five million centuries.

Competition and the thirst for profit without limits of the capitalist system are destroying the planet. Under Capitalism we are not human beings but consumers. Under Capitalism mother earth does not exist, instead there are raw materials. Capitalism is the source of the asymmetries and imbalances in the world. It generates luxury, ostentation and waste for a few, while millions in the world die from hunger in the world. In the hands of Capitalism everything becomes a commodity: the water, the soil, the human genome, the ancestral cultures, justice, ethics, death … and life itself. Everything, absolutely everything, can be bought and sold and under Capitalism. And even “climate change” itself has become a business.

“Climate change” has placed all humankind before great choice: to continue in the ways of capitalism and death, or to start down the path of harmony with nature and respect for life.

In the 1997 Kyoto Protocol, the developed countries and economies in transition committed to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions by at least 5% below the 1990 levels, through the implementation of different mechanisms among which market mechanisms predominate.

Until 2006, greenhouse effect gases, far from being reduced, have increased by 9.1% in relation to the 1990 levels, demonstrating also in this way the breach of commitments by the developed countries.

The market mechanisms applied in the developing countries have not accomplished a significant reduction of greenhouse effect gas emissions.

Just as well as the market is incapable of regulating global financial and productive system, the market is unable to regulate greenhouse effect gas emissions and will only generate a big business for financial agents and major corporations.

The earth is much more important than stock exchanges of Wall Street and the world.

While the United States and the European Union allocate 4,100 billion dollars to save the bankers from a financial crisis that they themselves have caused, programs on climate change get 313 times less, that is to say, only 13 billion dollars.

The resources for climate change are unfairly distributed. More resources are directed to reduce emissions (mitigation) and less to reduce the effects of climate change that all the countries suffer (adaptation). The vast majority of resources flow to those countries that have contaminated the most, and not to the countries where we have preserved the environment most. Around 80% of the Clean Development Mechanism projects are concentrated in four emerging countries.

Capitalist logic promotes a paradox in which the sectors that have contributed the most to deterioration of the environment are those that benefit the most from climate change programs.

At the same time, technology transfer and the financing for clean and sustainable development of the countries of the South have remained just speeches.

The next summit on Climate Change in Copenhagen must allow us to make a leap forward if we want to save Mother Earth and humanity. For that purpose the following proposals for the process from Poznan to Copenhagen:

 

 

Attack the structural causes of climate change

1)    Debate the structural causes of climate change. As long as we do not change the capitalist system for a system based in complementarity, solidarity and harmony between the people and nature, the measures that we adopt will be palliatives that will limited and precarious in character. For us, what has failed is the model of “living better”, of unlimited development, industrialisation without frontiers, of modernity that deprecates history, of increasing accumulation of goods at the expense of others and nature. For that reason we promote the idea of Living Well, in harmony with other human beings and with our Mother Earth.

2)    Developed countries need to control their patterns of consumption – of luxury and waste – especially the excessive consumption of fossil fuels.  Subsidies of fossil fuel, that reach 150-250 billions of dollars, must be progressively eliminated. It is fundamental to develop alternative forms of power, such as solar, geothermal, wind and hydroelectric both at small and medium scales.

3)    Agrofuels are not an alternative, because they put the production of foodstuffs for transport before the production of food for human beings. Agrofuels expand the agricultural frontier destroying forests and biodiversity, generate monocropping, promote land concentration, deteriorate soils, exhaust water sources, contribute to rises in food prices and, in many cases, result in more consumption of more energy than is produced.

Substantial commitments to emissions reduction that are met

4)    Strict fulfilment by 2012 of the commitments of the developed countries to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least by 5% below the 1990 levels. It is unacceptable that the countries that polluted the planet throughout the course of history make statements about larger reductions in the future while not complying with their present commitments.

5)    Establish new minimum commitments for the developed countries of greenhouse gas emission reduction of 40% by 2020 and 90% by for 2050, taking as a starting point 1990 emission levels. These minimum commitments must be met internally in developed countries and not through flexible market mechanisms that allow for the purchase of certified emissions reduction certificates to continue polluting in their own country. Likewise, monitoring mechanisms must be established for the measuring, reporting and verifying that are transparent and accessible to the public, to guarantee the compliance of commitments.

6)    Developing countries not responsible for the historical pollution must preserve the necessary space to implement an alternative and sustainable form of development that does not repeat the mistakes of savage industrialisation that has brought us to the current situation. To ensure this process, developing countries need, as a prerequisite, finance and technology transfer.

 

An Integral Financial Mechanism to address ecological debt

7)     Acknowledging the historical ecological debt that they owe to the planet, developed countries must create an Integral Financial Mechanism to support developing countries in: implementation of their plans and programmes for adaptation to and mitigation of climate change; the innovation, development and transfer of technology; in the preservation and improvement of the sinks and reservoirs; response actions to the serious natural disasters caused by climate change; and the carrying out of sustainable and eco-friendly development plans.

8)    This Integral Financial Mechanism, in order to be effective, must count on a contribution of at least 1% of the GDP in developed countries and other contributions from taxes on oil and gas, financial transactions, sea and air transport, and the profits of transnational companies. 

9)    Contributions from developed countries must be additional to Official Development Assistance (ODA), bilateral aid or aid channelled through organisms not part of the United Nations. Any finance outside the UNFCCC cannot be considered as the fulfilment of developed country’s commitments under the Convention.

10)          Finance has to be directed to the plans or national programmes of the different States and not to projects that follow market logic.

11)         Financing must not be concentrated just in some developed countries but has to give priority to the countries that have contributed less to greenhouse gas emissions, those that preserve nature and are suffering the impact of climate change.

12)         The Integral Financial Mechanism must be under the coverage of the United Nations, not under the Global Environment Facility (GEF) and other intermediaries such as the World Bank and regional development banks; its management must be collective, transparent and non-bureaucratic. Its decisions must be made by all member countries, especially by developing countries, and not by the donors or bureaucratic administrators.

Technology Transfer to developing countries

13)         Innovation and technology related to climate changes must be within the public domain, not under any private monopolistic patent regime that obstructs and makes technology transfer more expensive to developing countries.

14)         Products that are the fruit of public financing for technology innovation and development of have to be placed within the public domain and not under a private regime of patents, so that they can be freely accessed by developing countries.

15)         Encourage and improve the system of voluntary and compulsory licenses so that all countries can access products already patented quickly and free of cost. Developed countries cannot treat patents and intellectual property rights as something “sacred” that has to be preserved at any cost. The regime of flexibilities available for the intellectual property rights in the cases of serious problems for public health has to be adapted and substantially enlarged to heal Mother Earth.

16)         Recover and promote indigenous peoples practices in harmony with nature which have proven to be sustainable through centuries.

Adaptation and mitigation with the participation of all the people

17)         Promote mitigation actions, programs and plans with the participation of local communities and indigenous people in the framework of full respect for and implementation of the United Nations Declaration on Rights of Indigenous Peoples. The best mechanism to confront the challenge of climate change are not market mechanisms, but conscious, motivated, and well organized human beings endowed with an identity of their own.

18)         The reduction of the emissions from deforestation and forest degradation must be based on a mechanism of direct compensation from developed to developing countries, through a sovereign implementation that ensures broad participation of local communities, and a mechanism for monitoring, reporting and verifying that is transparent and public.

A UN for the Environment and Climate Change

19)         We need a World Environment and Climate Change Organization to which multilateral trade and financial organizations are subordinated, so as to promote a different model of development that environmentally friendly and resolves the profound problems of impoverishment.  This organization must have effective follow-up, verification and sanctioning mechanisms to ensure that the present and future agreements are complied with.

20)         It is fundamental to structurally transform the World Trade Organization, the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund and the international economic system as a whole, in order to guarantee fair and complementary trade, as well as financing without conditions for sustainable development that avoids the waste of natural resources and fossil fuels in the production processes, trade and product transport.

In this negotiation process towards Copenhagen, it is fundamental to guarantee the participation of our people as active stakeholders at a national, regional and worldwide level, especially taking into account those sectors most affected, such as indigenous peoples who have always promoted the defense of Mother Earth.

Humankind is capable of saving the earth if we recover the principles of solidarity, complementarity, and harmony with nature in contraposition to the reign of competition, profits and rampant consumption of natural resources.

November 28, 2008

Evo Morales Ayma

President of Bolivia

1-Due to the “Niña” phenomenon, that becomes more frequent as a result of the climate change, Bolivia has lost 4% of its GDP in 2007.

2-Known as the Clean Development Mechanism

3- At the present there is only one Adaptation Fund with approximately 500 million dollars for more than 150 developing countries. According to the UNFCCC Secretary, 171 billion dollars are required for adaptation, and 380 billion dollars are required for mitigation.

4-Stern report

5- Kyoto Protocol, Art. 3.

6- The Stern Review has suggested one percent of global GDP, which represents less than 700 billion dollars per year.

7-According to UNCTAD (1998), Public financing in developing countries contributes with 40% of the resources for innovation and development of technology.

Indigenous Caucus Make First Statement on the Opening Day of the United Nations Framework Conference on Climate Change (UNFCCC), 14th Session of Conference of the Parties (COP14)

Monday, December 1st, 2008

Statement of the

International Forum of Indigenous Peoples on Climate Change (IIPFCC) to the 29th Session of the Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technical Advice (SBSTA), during the 14th Session of the Conference of the Parties (COP14) of the United Nations Framework Conference on Climate Change (UNFCCC)

December 1, 2008 

 Chair,

The International Indigenous Peoples Forum on Climate Change (IIPFCC), representing IPs from different parts of the world met from 27–29 November 2008 here in Poznan, Poland, to prepare for the Fourteenth Conference of the Parties to the UNFCCC.

We, the Indigenous Peoples have suffered the worst impacts of climate change without having contributed to its creation.

We must not be placed in the position of suffering from mitigation strategies which we believe have offered false solutions to the problem at hand. And even worse, many of the mitigation and adaptation schemes being discussed in UNFCCC and related processes threaten our rights and our very existence.

Mitigation projects, including REDD and CDM, implemented by Parties and private sector are carried out without the free prior and informed consent of Indigenous Peoples there by affecting our livelihoods and violating our human rights.

These projects are encroaching on areas of lands sacred to us, and producing the forced eviction of many of our brothers and sisters from their ancestral territories. 

Furthermore, proposed ‘scientific’ mitigation and adaptation solutions, methodologies and technologies being discussed here and elsewhere do not reflect Indigenous Peoples’ cosmovision and our ancestral knowledge.

So-called ‘consultations’ with us, often only take the form of simply informing our communities. Consultations should not be limited to specific communities and organizations but should involve all affected and involved indigenous peoples, including our representative organizations.

We the Indigenous Peoples demand full participation in the implementation of all areas of work concerning Climate Change and Forests.

We put the following recommendations forward:

·         To ensure a rights-based approach in the design and implementation of climate change policies, programmes and projects. In particular, the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples must be recognized, implemented and mainstreamed in all of the Convention activities;

·         To ensure the right to Free Prior and Informed Consent in line with internationally recognized standards of good governance;

·         To develop methodologies and tools for impacts and vulnerability assessments  in consultation with indigenous peoples;

·         To recognize and use traditional knowledge and integrating it with scientific knowledge in assessing impacts and coming up with adaptations;

·         To ensure the proper capacity building of indigenous peoples in technologies for adaptation;

·         To immediately  suspend  all REDD initiatives in Indigenous territories until Indigenous Peoples’ rights are fully recognized and promoted;

·         To include  indigenous peoples’ experts in the implementation of phase II of Nairobi Programme of Work;

·         To set up a disaster reduction strategies and means to address loss and damage associated with climate change mitigation projects and policies, impacts in indigenous peoples territories;

 Thank you.

Note: The International Forum of Indigenous Peoples on Climate Change (IIPFCC) is the Indigenous Peoples Caucus convened during the UNFCCC COP14. The Caucus represents Indigenous participants from the North and South.

 

Climate Activists Invade Washington DC Offices of Environmental Defense

Monday, December 1st, 2008

read also: Daughter of EDF Founder Accuses Group of Pushing False Solutions to Climate Change. To read full statement of Dr. Rachel Smolker CLICK: HERE

EVO MORALES ISSUES STATEMENT ON CLIMATE

Monday, December 1st, 2008

This letter was forwarded to IEN during the COP14 UNFCCC meeting in Poznan, Poland. This statement indicates a growing global resistance to carbon markets as solutions towards addressing climate change/globalwarming (i.e. RED/Ds, forest carbon offsets, carbon trading, etc.). IEN has a delegation at this United Nations meeting on climate.  – Tom Goldtooth, Indigenous Environmental Network (IEN).

Climate Change:

Save the Planet from Capitalism

Sisters and brothers:

Today, our Mother Earth is ill. From the beginning of the 21st century we have lived the hottest years of the last thousand years. Global warming is generating abrupt changes in the weather: the retreat of glaciers and the decrease of the polar ice caps; the increase of the sea level and the flooding of coastal areas, where approximately 60% of the world population live; the increase in the processes of desertification and the decrease of fresh water sources; a higher frequency in natural disasters that the communities of the earth suffer[1]; the extinction of animal and vegetal species; and the spread of diseases in areas that before were free from those diseases.

One of the most tragic consequences of the climate change is that some nations and territories are the condemned to disappear by the increase of the sea level.

Everything began with the industrial revolution in 1750, which gave birth to the capitalist system. In two and a half centuries, the so called developed countries have consumed a large part of the fossil fuels created over five million centuries.

Competition and the thirst for profit without limits of the capitalist system are destroying the planet. Under Capitalism we are not human beings but consumers. Under Capitalism mother earth does not exist, instead there are raw materials. Capitalism is the source of the asymmetries and imbalances in the world. It generates luxury, ostentation and waste for a few, while millions in the world die from hunger in the world. In the hands of Capitalism everything becomes a commodity: the water, the soil, the human genome, the ancestral cultures, justice, ethics, death and life itself. Everything, absolutely everything, can be bought and sold and under Capitalism. And even climate change itself has become a business.Climate change has placed all humankind before great choice: to continue in the ways of capitalism and death, or to start down the path of harmony with nature and respect for life.

In the 1997 Kyoto Protocol, the developed countries and economies in transition committed to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions by at least 5% below the 1990 levels, through the implementation of different mechanisms among which market mechanisms predominate.

Until 2006, greenhouse effect gases, far from being reduced, have increased by 9.1% in relation to the 1990 levels, demonstrating also in this way the breach of commitments by the developed countries.

The market mechanisms applied in the developing countries[2] have not accomplished a significant reduction of greenhouse effect gas emissions.

Just as well as the market is incapable of regulating global financial and productive system, the market is unable to regulate greenhouse effect gas emissions and will only generate a big business for financial agents and major corporations.

The earth is much more important than stock exchanges of Wall Street and the world.While the United States and the European Union allocate 4,100 billion dollars to save the bankers from a financial crisis that they themselves have caused, programs on climate change get 313 times less, that is to say, only 13 billion dollars.

The resources for climate change are unfairly distributed. More resources are directed to reduce emissions (mitigation) and less to reduce the effects of climate change that all the countries suffer (adaptation)
[3]. The vast majority of resources flow to those countries that have contaminated the most, and not to the countries where we have preserved the environment most. Around 80% of the Clean Development Mechanism projects are concentrated in four emerging countries.

Capitalist logic promotes a paradox in which the sectors that have contributed the most to deterioration of the environment are those that benefit the most from climate change programs.

At the same time, technology transfer and the financing for clean and sustainable development of the countries of the South have remained just speeches.

The next summit on Climate Change in Copenhagen must allow us to make a leap forward if we want to save Mother Earth and humanity. For that purpose the following proposals for the process from Poznan to Copenhagen:

Attack the structural causes of climate change

1)    Debate the structural causes of climate change. As long as we do not change the capitalist system for a system based in complementarity, solidarity and harmony between the people and nature, the measures that we adopt will be palliatives that will limited and precarious in character. For us, what has failed is the model of living better, of unlimited development, industrialisation without frontiers, of modernity that deprecates history, of increasing accumulation of goods at the expense of others and nature. For that reason we promote the idea of Living Well, in harmony with other human beings and with our Mother Earth.

2)    Developed countries need to control their patterns of consumption – of luxury and waste – especially the excessive consumption of fossil fuels.  Subsidies of fossil fuel, that reach 150-250 billions of dollars[4], must be progressively eliminated. It is fundamental to develop alternative forms of power, such as solar, geothermal, wind and hydroelectric both at small and medium scales.

3)    Agrofuels are not an alternative, because they put the production of foodstuffs for transport before the production of food for human beings. Agrofuels expand the agricultural frontier destroying forests and biodiversity, generate monocropping, promote land concentration, deteriorate soils, exhaust water sources, contribute to rises in food prices and, in many cases, result in more consumption of more energy than is produced.

Substantial commitments to emissions reduction that are met

4)    Strict fulfilment by 2012 of the commitments[5] of the developed countries to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least by 5% below the 1990 levels. It is unacceptable that the countries that polluted the planet throughout the course of history make statements about larger reductions in the future while not complying with their present commitments.

5)    Establish new minimum commitments for the developed countries of greenhouse gas emission reduction of 40% by 2020 and 90% by for 2050, taking as a starting point 1990 emission levels. These minimum commitments must be met internally in developed countries and not through flexible market mechanisms that allow for the purchase of certified emissions reduction certificates to continue polluting in their own country. Likewise, monitoring mechanisms must be established for the measuring, reporting and verifying that are transparent and accessible to the public, to guarantee the compliance of commitments.

6)    Developing countries not responsible for the historical pollution must preserve the necessary space to implement an alternative and sustainable form of development that does not repeat the mistakes of savage industrialisation that has brought us to the current situation. To ensure this process, developing countries need, as a prerequisite, finance and technology transfer.

An Integral Financial Mechanism to address ecological debt

7)     Acknowledging the historical ecological debt that they owe to the planet, developed countries must create an Integral Financial Mechanism to support developing countries in: implementation of their plans and programmes for adaptation to and mitigation of climate change; the innovation, development and transfer of technology; in the preservation and improvement of the sinks and reservoirs; response actions to the serious natural disasters caused by climate change; and the carrying out of sustainable and eco-friendly development plans.

8)    This Integral Financial Mechanism, in order to be effective, must count on a contribution of at least 1% of the GDP in developed countries[6] and other contributions from taxes on oil and gas, financial transactions, sea and air transport, and the profits of transnational companies. 

9)    Contributions from developed countries must be additional to Official Development Assistance (ODA), bilateral aid or aid channelled through organisms not part of the United Nations. Any finance outside the UNFCCC cannot be considered as the fulfilment of developed countrys commitments under the Convention.

10)  Finance has to be directed to the plans or national programmes of the different States and not to projects that follow market logic.

11) Financing must not be concentrated just in some developed countries but has to give priority to the countries that have contributed less to greenhouse gas emissions, those that preserve nature and are suffering the impact of climate change.

12) The Integral Financial Mechanism must be under the coverage of the United Nations, not under the Global Environment Facility (GEF) and other intermediaries such as the World Bank and regional development banks; its management must be collective, transparent and non-bureaucratic. Its decisions must be made by all member countries, especially by developing countries, and not by the donors or bureaucratic administrators.

Technology Transfer to developing countries

13) Innovation and technology related to climate changes must be within the public domain, not under any private monopolistic patent regime that obstructs and makes technology transfer more expensive to developing countries.

14) Products that are the fruit of public financing for technology innovation and development of have to be placed within the public domain and not under a private regime of patents[7], so that they can be freely accessed by developing countries.

15) Encourage and improve the system of voluntary and compulsory licenses so that all countries can access products already patented quickly and free of cost. Developed countries cannot treat patents and intellectual property rights as something sacred that has to be preserved at any cost. The regime of flexibilities available for the intellectual property rights in the cases of serious problems for public health has to be adapted and substantially enlarged to heal Mother Earth.

16) Recover and promote indigenous peoples practices in harmony with nature which have proven to be sustainable through centuries.

Adaptation and mitigation with the participation of all the people

17)
Promote mitigation actions, programs and plans with the participation of local communities and indigenous people in the framework of full respect for and implementation of the United Nations Declaration on Rights of Indigenous Peoples. The best mechanism to confront the challenge of climate change are not market mechanisms, but conscious, motivated, and well organized human beings endowed with an identity of their own.

18) The reduction of the emissions from deforestation and forest degradation must be based on a mechanism of direct compensation from developed to developing countries, through a sovereign implementation that ensures broad participation of local communities, and a mechanism for monitoring, reporting and verifying that is transparent and public.

A UN for the Environment and Climate Change

19) We need a World Environment and Climate Change Organization to which multilateral trade and financial organizations are subordinated, so as to promote a different model of development that environmentally friendly and resolves the profound problems of impoverishment.  This organization must have effective follow-up, verification and sanctioning mechanisms to ensure that the present and future agreements are complied with.

20) It is fundamental to structurally transform the World Trade Organization, the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund and the international economic system as a whole, in order to guarantee fair and complementary trade, as well as financing without conditions for sustainable development that avoids the waste of natural resources and fossil fuels in the production processes, trade and product transport.In this negotiation process towards Copenhagen, it is fundamental to guarantee the participation of our people as active stakeholders at a national, regional and worldwide level, especially taking into account those sectors most affected, such as indigenous peoples who have always promoted the defense of Mother Earth.

Humankind is capable of saving the earth if we recover the principles of solidarity, complementarity, and harmony with nature in contraposition to the reign of competition, profits and rampant consumption of natural resources.

November 28, 2008

Evo Morales Ayma, President of Bolivia